Washington Post

WP retireTHIS IS YOUR BRAIN ON RETIREMENT — NOT NEARLY AS SHARP, STUDIES ARE FINDING
by  / October 29, 2015

Retiring at 55 and spending the rest of your life relaxing on the front porch may sound appealing, but if you want your brain to keep working, it’s probably not a good idea. Mounting evidence shows that staying in the workforce into old age is good not only for our bank accounts, but also for our health and mental acuity.

That’s great news for Americans, who keep working further into old age on average than Europeans, and who will be retiring even later than previously, thanks to changes built in to Social Security benefits.

As medical advances extend the length of the human lifespan — and the number of healthy, active years — scientists, economists and policymakers are delving into the question of what the optimial time to stop working is.

One message is becoming clear: don’t stop too soon.

It could be that, even as they reach retirement age, Americans just feel better when they work. In a 2013 Careerbuilder.com survey, sixty percent of workers age 60 and older said they would look for a new job after retiring. And a 2010 report by the Sloan Center and the Families and Work Institute said 75 percent of workers expected to work or embark on a second career after retirement.

 

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